Digital Badges and the 21st Century Resume

Guest post by Michael Braithwaite

Communications skills, team work, design, chess champ, social media mastery, and competitive bocce ball: It might sound like a strange list of job qualifications, but as companies increasingly seek out employees who can accomplish a wide range of tasks across a growing number of technologies, all the while being a team player, they’re looking for skills and experiences that paint a more holistic picture of an applicant. Gone are the days of employees working solo on repetitive, finite tasks. Today’s workplace is constantly changing, built on rapidly evolving technology and often spanning multiple countries. It requires good communicators, fast and creative thinkers, and flexibility.

That’s where digital badges come in. A bit like supercharged merit badges, digital badges are emerging as a new angle on credentialing, redefining how learning is recognized in a digital age that requires a broad range of skills, passion, and diversity of experience.

Hub alum Bryan Norato during a White House Google+ Hangout.

Hub alum Bryan Norato during a White House Google+ Hangout.

Or at least, that’s what the White House thinks. Last Thursday, the Office of Science Technology Policy hosted a “We the Geeks” Google+ Hangout that was broadcast nationally and discussed the current use of digital badges and their potential to redefine not only the professional landscape, but the educational one as well.

Bryan Norato, University of Rhode Island freshman and alumni of the Hub—a credit-bearing after-school system for high school youth in Providence—helped shed some light on the subject of digital badges in a conversation with Erin Knight, Senior Director of Learning & Badges at the Mozilla Foundation; Connie Yowell, Director of Education for U.S. Programs at the MacArthur Foundation; and Richard Culatta, Acting Director of the Office of Educational Technology at the Department of Education.

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